New Cochrane review: Intravenous versus inhalational maintenance of anaesthesia for postoperative cognitive outcomes in elderly people undergoing non-cardiac surgery

New Cochrane review: Intravenous versus inhalational maintenance of anaesthesia for postoperative cognitive outcomes in elderly people undergoing non-cardiac surgery

The use of anaesthetics in the elderly surgical population (more than 60 years of age) is increasing. Postoperative delirium, an acute condition characterised by reduced awareness of the environment and a disturbance in attention, typically occurs between 24 and 72 hours after surgery and can affect up to 60 per cent of elderly surgical patients.
In the new Cochrane review, researchers found little or no difference in postoperative delirium according to the type of anaesthetic maintenance agents from five studies (321 participants). We found that fewer people experienced postoperative cognitive dysfunction when TIVA with propofol was used in seven studies (869 participants). One study was excluded from analysis of this outcome because study authors had used methods to anaesthetise people which were not standard.
The new review ‘Intravenous versus inhalational maintenance of anaesthesia for postoperative cognitive outcomes in elderly people undergoing non-cardiac surgery’ (Anaesthesia, Critical and Emergency Care Group, 10.1002/14651858.CD012317.pub2) was published in August 2018, in the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, Issue 8, 2018. You can access it here: https://www.cochranelibrary.com/cdsr/doi/10.1002/14651858.CD012317.pub2/full#CD012317-abs-0002
Cochrane is a global independent network of researchers, professionals, patients, carers and people interested in health. Cochrane produces reviews which study all of the best available evidence generated through research and make it easier to inform decisions about health. These are called systematic reviews.  Cochrane is a not-for profit organization with collaborators from more than 130 countries working together to produce credible, accessible health information that is free from commercial sponsorship and other conflicts of interest. The work is recognized as representing an international gold standard for high quality, trusted information.

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